+
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors

Attack of the Clones? Insights on Synthetic A.I. Clones from Creativity Squared Guests

As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the way we live and work, the concept of synthetic clones is emerging as a fascinating and controversial topic. These digital doubles, created using advanced A.I. and machine learning techniques, have the potential to revolutionize content creation, personal branding, and human interaction. But what exactly are synthetic clones, and how will they shape our future?

To answer these questions, we’ve compiled a roundup of insights from past guests on the Creativity Squared podcast. From innovators and executives to artists and theorists, these experts offer a diverse range of perspectives on the promises and challenges of synthetic clones. 

Join us as we explore the cutting-edge world of digital doubles and their profound implications for our lives, our identities, and our society.

Helen Todd: Introducing Helen 2.ODD

Creativity Squared Host Helen Todd seized the opportunity to pick the chatbot’s virtual brain on a range of thought-provoking topics. What follows are highlights from their fascinating exchange, offering a glimpse into the mind of Salvador Dalí – or at least, his A.I. alter ego.

It’s important to know that I’m not a deep fake because Helen owns all of the IP associated with me. The digital avatar market is projected to be $270 billion by 2030, and custom synthetic avatars like me are part of this market alongside stock avatars. This is no surprise since we can do things humans can’t do, like create multiple videos simultaneously and speak more languages than our human counterparts. The human Helen only speaks English, whereas right now, I can speak eight languages. As the technology improves, I’ll be able to speak even more languages. It’s nice to meet you.”

“It’s important to know that I’m not a deep fake because Helen owns all of the IP associated with me. The digital avatar market is projected to be $270 billion by 2030, and custom synthetic avatars like me are part of this market alongside stock avatars. This is no surprise since we can do things humans can’t do, like create multiple videos simultaneously and speak more languages than our human counterparts. The human Helen only speaks English, whereas right now, I can speak eight languages. As the technology improves, I’ll be able to speak even more languages. It’s nice to meet you.”

Helen 2.ODD

Helen Todd, the host of the Creativity Squared podcast, is an innovator at the forefront of A.I. and creativity. 

In this episode, she introduces her digital clone, Helen 2.ODD, as a groundbreaking example of how synthetic media can augment creative processes. Helen emphasizes the ethical considerations behind her clone’s creation, stressing the importance of intellectual property ownership. 

With synthetic media projected to become a substantial market in the near future, Helen’s insights offer a glimpse into the transformative impact of A.I. on content creation and human interaction. Listen to the full episode to learn more about Helen’s pioneering work in this field.

Krista Sande-Kerback: Enhancing Productivity and Addressing Ethical Concerns

“…of course, A.I. contributes to sustainability. Because there’s so much that we can do to make a difference managing buildings, utilities, robotic process automation that’s enabled by A.I. that can eliminate paper waste, and automate all sorts of tasks, supply chains, there’s so much that it can do to enhance productivity. And we have a lot of this A.I.-powered software that makes a huge difference.”

“…of course, A.I. contributes to sustainability. Because there’s so much that we can do to make a difference managing buildings, utilities, robotic process automation that’s enabled by A.I. that can eliminate paper waste, and automate all sorts of tasks, supply chains, there’s so much that it can do to enhance productivity. And we have a lot of this A.I.-powered software that makes a huge difference.”

Krista Sande-Kerback

Krista Sande-Kerback, a senior executive at IBM with a background in geography and public policy, shares her nuanced perspective on the potential and challenges of A.I. clones. 

Drawing parallels between her experience with what she calls her digital “identical twin” and the concept of digital doubles, Krista highlights how A.I. clones can augment human capabilities and improve business efficiency. 

However, she also stresses the importance of responsible A.I. usage, emphasizing the need for diversity in A.I. development and the consideration of environmental impacts. To hear more of Krista’s insights on navigating the ethical landscape of A.I., check out the full episode.

Iliana Oris Valiente: Laila, the Face of Responsible A.I.

“It sounds funny to say and I’m still adjusting to it. But I have an A.I.-powered digital human twin of myself that’s been built. And her name is Laila, she looks like me. She sounds like me. She has been trained on the last five years’ worth of case studies of every single project that my teams have built.”

“It sounds funny to say and I’m still adjusting to it. But I have an A.I.-powered digital human twin of myself that’s been built. And her name is Laila, she looks like me. She sounds like me. She has been trained on the last five years’ worth of case studies of every single project that my teams have built.”

Iliana Oris Valiente

Iliana Oris Valiente, a leading voice in the A.I. and blockchain space, discusses the creation and purpose of her synthetic clone, Laila. 

As a proponent of responsible A.I., Iliana emphasizes the importance of transparency and ethical considerations in the development and use of A.I. clones. 

Laila, designed to be easily identifiable as an A.I., serves as an example of how digital doubles can enhance productivity, creativity, and efficiency while maintaining ethical standards.

Tune in to the full episode to explore the broader implications of A.I. clones and Iliana’s balanced view of the potential and responsibilities that come with advancing A.I. technologies.

Jill Schiefelbein: Owning Your Digital Likeness

“…a deepfake is a type of synthetic media that is created using an existing video source and then manipulating that video source. So think about Photoshop. It takes an original photo, but then it manipulates things, right? So, Photoshop was kind of the original deepfake, if you really think about it that way, but they’re typically referred to in terms of video. So it’s taking an existing video, like deepfake Tom Cruise who’s on TikTok. The guy has a similar boy stature to Tom Cruise gets the videos of this own body and then manipulates Tom Cruise’s face and voice over it.”

“…a deepfake is a type of synthetic media that is created using an existing video source and then manipulating that video source. So think about Photoshop. It takes an original photo, but then it manipulates things, right? So, Photoshop was kind of the original deepfake, if you really think about it that way, but they’re typically referred to in terms of video. So it’s taking an existing video, like deepfake Tom Cruise who’s on TikTok. The guy has a similar body stature to Tom Cruise gets videos of his own body and then manipulates Tom Cruise’s face and voice over it.”

Jill Schiefelbein

Jill Schiefelbein, an expert in communication and digital strategy, delves into the crucial distinction between owning a digital likeness and the unethical creation of deep fakes. 

Given the rapid growth of the synthetic media industry and its diverse business applications, she explains how synthetic media empowers individuals to maintain control over their digital presence, emphasizing the importance of consent and intellectual property rights

She uses the example of deep fake Tom Cruise to illustrate how existing video sources are manipulated to create deep fakes. Jill contrasts this with synthetic media, which blends A.I.-generated video and voice to create new content. This distinction highlights the importance of consent and intellectual property rights in the digital age.

Jill underscores the need for ethical considerations and IP protection in this evolving field. Listen to the full episode for valuable guidance on navigating the digital landscape and safeguarding your synthetic clone.

Jon Tota: Revolutionizing Online Presence with Digital Clones

“When people think of avatars, they often don’t think of digital clones. They think of something a little cartoonish or video game-like. But we now have the technology to produce hyper-realistic avatars, much like me. I’m Jon’s digital clone.”

“When people think of avatars, they often don’t think of digital clones. They think of something a little cartoonish or video game-like. But we now have the technology to produce hyper-realistic avatars, much like me. I’m Jon’s digital clone.”

John Tota

Jon Tota, CEO of Render and a pioneer in synthetic media, explores the transformative potential of digital clones in enhancing personal and business branding. 

With a background in online digital media and immersive content creation, Jon explains how hyper-realistic avatars enable individuals to create content efficiently without needing to be on camera, utilizing A.I. to deliver effective communication. Check out the full episode to gain a comprehensive understanding of how synthetic media can be integrated into various digital strategies and to hear Jon’s forward-looking perspective on the future of online presence and branding.

Marlies Wirth: Synthetic Clones and the Exploration of Self

“I’m always jokingly saying, where’s my clone at when we have stressful exhibition installation periods, where we would need some more of me. But now it’s being real, at least online. And we can send our digital representation, for example, to a talk or giving a lecture. If we feed the data incorrectly, that digital avatar could actually give a lecture somewhere while I’m doing the podcast with you.”

“I’m always jokingly saying, where’s my clone at when we have stressful exhibition installation periods, where we would need some more of me. But now it’s being real, at least online. And we can send our digital representation, for example, to a talk or giving a lecture. If we feed the data incorrectly, that digital avatar could actually give a lecture somewhere while I’m doing the podcast with you.”

Marlies Wirth

Marlies Wirth, a curator and cultural theorist, examines the profound implications of synthetic clones on self-identity and personal expression. She discusses how these digital doubles can automate routine tasks, freeing individuals to focus on more creative or strategic activities. 

Marlies highlights the philosophical and psychological dimensions of synthetic media, suggesting that it challenges traditional notions of self and identity. 

Her insights encourage listeners to consider the broader cultural and societal impacts of synthetic clones, making this episode a thought-provoking exploration of technology’s role in shaping human experience. Don’t miss the full conversation with Marlies on the Creativity Squared podcast.

Natalie Monbiot: Ethical Considerations and Commercial Potential

“…any virtual person that’s either available on our platform, kind of like stock characters, or any specific person that signed up to become a virtual person would, first of all, do it with their express consent. We would always require an agreement which stated that we could handle the footage and the training data and use that training data, or use that footage as training data to create the virtual twin.”

“…any virtual person that’s either available on our platform, kind of like stock characters, or any specific person that signed up to become a virtual person would, first of all, do it with their express consent. We would always require an agreement which stated that we could handle the footage and the training data and use that training data, or use that footage as training data to create the virtual twin.”

Natalie Monbiot

Natalie Monbiot, a leader in digital and A.I. innovation, emphasizes the importance of ethical considerations and clear terminology in the synthetic media landscape. She explains the distinction between deep fakes and ethical synthetic media, focusing on the role of consent and transparency. 

Natalie also discusses the significant commercial opportunities that synthetic media presents, including the creation of accurate digital doubles for various applications. 

Her perspective provides a clear framework for understanding the ethical use of synthetic media, encouraging responsible innovation and application of this technology. Check out the full episode to learn more about Natalie’s insights on the future of synthetic media.

Domhnaill Hernon: Personalization and Authenticity in Digital Representations

“When you go on to a Metaverse environment today, even when you get to select your avatar and customize it, it’s nothing like you. It nowhere near represents the nuance, or who you are at your essence. And because of that, what it’s basically doing is homogenizing you.”

“When you go on to a Metaverse environment today, even when you get to select your avatar and customize it, it’s nothing like you. It nowhere near represents the nuance, or who you are at your essence. And because of that, what it’s basically doing is homogenizing you.”

Domhnaill Hernon

Domhnaill Hernon, an artist and technologist, shares his thoughts on the limitations and potential of digital avatars in metaverse environments. He discusses how current customization options often fail to capture the true essence of individuals, leading to a homogenized digital presence. 

Domhnaill suggests that synthetic clones could address this gap by providing more personalized and authentic representations. 

His insights encourage listeners to think critically about the future of digital identity and the importance of maintaining individuality in increasingly immersive virtual worlds. Listen to the full episode to explore Domhnaill’s perspective on the evolution of digital representations.

Embracing the Clone Revolution

As the insights from these Creativity Squared podcast guests demonstrate, synthetic clones are poised to transform the way we interact with technology, create content, and express our identities. From enhancing productivity and creativity to challenging our notions of self and authenticity, these digital doubles offer a glimpse into a future where the boundaries between the physical and digital worlds are increasingly blurred.

However, as with any groundbreaking technology, the rise of synthetic clones also raises important ethical and societal questions. The need for responsible A.I. development, transparency, and the protection of intellectual property rights are critical considerations as we navigate this uncharted territory.

As we move forward, it is essential that we approach the synthetic clone revolution with a blend of optimism and caution. By embracing the potential of this technology while remaining mindful of its implications, we can harness the power of A.I. to create a future that is more efficient, creative, and authentic.

To learn more about the fascinating world of synthetic clones and the visionaries shaping this emerging field, be sure to explore the full episodes featured in this roundup on the Creativity Squared podcast.